172 Hours On the Moon | Johan Harstad

172 Hours on the Moon has been a disappointing story.

The premise is great; the photographs and maps are great, but the writing lets the whole thing down.

I’m not sure if the problem lies with the original storytelling by Harstad or if it’s the translation by Tara F. Chace. Somewhere, though, it falls flat. The language is boring, the dialogue seems stilted and the overall tone fails to capture one’s imagination.

The bits that should have been eerie and scary just made me laugh out loud. And I always knew when someone was about to die because of the sudden flashback to a meaningful childhood moment or a happy time memory in the park with the wife and kids!

 

Maybe I’m just becoming hard to please or jaded? But I expect more from a book. I expect to be moved, entertained, stimulated, informed but most importantly I expect to be caught up by the magic and mystery of being lost in another world. That’s where this book let me down.

Even though this book was unsuccessful on many levels, it could be a fabulous movie.
A complete new (vamped up) script, the possibility of amazing location shots in Paris, Japan, Norway, New York and of course, the moon! It could be turned into a really scary, psychological thriller.

The Swedish actress, Noomi Rapace who played The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo could be Mia, Rinko Kikuchi could play Midori and Cyril Mourali could play Antoine.

Three teenagers are going on the trip of a lifetime. Only one is coming back.

It’s been more than forty years since NASA sent the first men to the moon, and to grab some much-needed funding and attention, they decide to launch an historic international lottery in which three lucky teenagers can win a week-long trip to moon base DARLAH 2 – a place that no one but top government officials even knew existed until now.

The three winners, Antoine, Midori, and Mia, come from all over the world. But just before the scheduled launch, the teenagers each experience strange, inexplicable events. Little do they know that there was a reason NASA never sent anyone back there until now-a sinister reason. But the countdown has already begun. . .

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